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Plantilla B
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Border Collie Los Baganes

Hometime

  

First and foremost, it is of the utmost importance that you inform yourself about the chosen breed - you can call and visit us as many times as you would like to/ however many times you deem to be necessary. One of our mantras is that there is no such thing as a foolish question; a fool would be the one who didn’t ask.


Once you have it clear in your own mind that you would like a dog, you need to read about their necessities in order to prepare both yourself and your home for the arrival of the puppy. You will also have to think about the rules that you wish to set down amongst those who are going to live with the puppy; rules that every member of the household will have to abide by - both dog and humans alike!


Before you know it, week eight has rolled around and it’s time for you to go and collect your chosen puppy.


At the beginning, it is important to let the puppy be so that he/ she gets used to his/ her new home - whether it be to unfamiliar smells and/ or objects. It is normal that the puppy seems a little shy/ reserved - after all, his/ her whole world has changed with this shift in environments!


If your puppy does not eat - or eats very little - to begin with, do not worry; this is fairly common. Afterwards, however, it is important to feed him/ her in accordance with a strict set of guidelines: it is essential to give the puppy quality feed in suitable quantities (200-250 grams/ day depending on the brand). Furthermore, do not give him/ his treats in the interim period; this will satiate his/ her appetite and mean that he/ she eats less of the feed than he/ she ideally should. Thankfully, Border Collies are not gluttonous: they will eat what they need to and no more. Bear in mind that Border Collies should not be fat: their ribs should be discernible. If you overfeed your puppy, this could lead to him/ her suffering from diarrhea - an occurrence unpleasant for both the puppy and his/ her owner.


Furthermore, it is highly advisable to show the puppy who is ‘leader’ - the ‘top dog’ - while they eat; that’s to say, touch the puppy, the feed, take some of the feed away - even take it out of his/ her mouth. This is an efficient means of demonstrating to the puppy that you are the leader and that, consequently, they have to respect you - this avoids the adult dog from deeming themselves to be the head of the pack in your home. Every member of the household ought to do the same in order to make for a more harmonious cohabitation.


With regards to water, we recommend that the puppy solely drinks bottled water during the first week since every place has its own bacteria and microbes - it is better to introduce them to the puppy’s system on a ‘drip-feed’ basis.


When the puppy has adapted to his/ her new environment, it is now the time to teach him/ her his/ her name; both for when he/ she behaves and for when he/ she gets up to no good! It is very important to have this distinction since, if you scold your puppy with one name one day and then call him/ her by it the next, the puppy will be confused; most probably, he/ she will end up thinking “Should I stay or should I go? Am I in trouble again?” Although it might seem obvious, you have to teach the puppy both the meaning of the word ‘no’ and the fact that ‘no’ does indeed mean ‘no’. With these three simple rules, everything will all-but be in order. Remember: Border Collies were originally bred in order to obey and please the owner - they were the eyes, ears and legs of the shepherd -  hence doing so comes naturally to them.


During the first couple of days, do not try to teach the puppy too much more; it is not necessary to pester the poor thing. Although Border Collies are very intelligent and clever, you do not want to end up with a state of affairs in which your puppy is overwhelmed and simply does not want to learn. Therefore, we recommend 5-10 minutes a day, no more - this in addition to taking into consideration whether the puppy wants to learn. If your puppy initially appears to be a little apathetic when it comes to being taught/ trained, leave him/ her be - you have weeks, months and years ahead during which to do so!


It is also important to point out that the puppy will not be able to go out to the street until he/ she is completely vaccinated.


The following may be a little difficult to comprehend: do not let the puppy run around and play with balls in the house. “Why?” you may ask. The fact of the matter is that, by doing so, you could subconsciously forment the puppy being active in the house - whether you yourself want to play or not. Of course you can play with your four-legged friend, teach him/ her tricks and commands - but do not let him/ her run around willy nilly; that is what the street and the great outdoors are for!


If you teach the dog to be calm and relaxed at home, and to exercise, run around and such like outdoors, you will have a peaceful dog at home and a thoroughbred Border Collie out in the open!


When it comes to balls to use and play with, be careful with tennis balls - they are abrasive on dogs’ teeth, hence it is better to use either rubber or leather examples.


One last, important thing to mention is that it is essential to avoid what is known as ‘separation anxiety’. This can be achieved by not paying attention to your dog when departing nor upon arriving home; leave the emotional reunions and tearful goodbyes to Hollywood! If you follow these guidelines from day one, you will have a balanced dog who sees you leaving and returning as completely normal.


For now, that is all!

  

What to do with your little one